Wednesday, 1 May 2013

Chitrangada learning Kathak, Urdu for her next film

PTI

Actress Chitrangada Singh is gearing up for her next film for which she is taking diction and dance lessons.

Chitrangada was last seen in I Me Aur Main alongside John Abraham and Prachi Desai. The film, released early in March, did fairly well at the box office.

“I am doing workshop for my next film. I am working on my Hindi and Urdu diction, I am taking diction classes.

Also, I am taking dance classes, learning Kathak,” Chitrangada said at an event.

The dusky beauty declined to divulge any details about her upcoming film and insisted the producers will make the ann nouncement in this regard.

“Unfortunately, I cannot talk about it. All I can say is I am working for it. I think by the end of the year everyone will see me on the big screen again.” “The character I am playing is interen esting. I haven’t been offered anything like that. It is very challenging and amazing. It may sound cliched but it is a very interesting character,” the Hazaaron Khwaishen Aisi actress said.

Earlier, in an interview to , Chitrangada had said “There are two films that are finalin ised. They are totally in commercial space.

One is an action-thriller and the other is a drama.”

Vidyut Jamwal not rich spoilt brat, says mother

IANS

Vimla Jamwal says her actor son Vidyut Jamwal is not a “rich, spoilt brat”. Rather he is a carin ing son and brother and “sincere” and “hard-working person.” Vimla, who fondly calls Vidyut Singu, said: “Singu is not a rich, spoilt brat. He is a sincere and hard-working person. He knows what he wants from life.” “Vidyut’s father passed away when he was a child. But he has always taken good care of me and his sister. I have always told him to be a good human being and respect women,” Vidyut’s mother, a former Miss Jammu and Kashmir, told reporters recently.

Vidyut was in New Delhi along with his mother to launch a survey on the occasion of Mother’s Day, which is on May 12.

Usually siblings fight, but the Commando star never fought with his sister. Even when, his sister would bully him, he never raised his hand on her, said Vimla.

“He respects women a lot. In his film Commando, he teaches girls’ self-defence techniques, which is a good thing. In real life also, he is the same person - strong and focused,” she added.

On his marriage plans, his mother said: “He keeps telling me about the girls he likes and I tell him, I’ll fix evern rything with them.” Meanwhile, Vidyut informed that this was the first time he attended any event with his mother.

“On the flight I was preparing her for the event and told her not to cry.

Indian mothers are amazing. They live their lives for their families. It shouldn’t be this way. They need to live for themselves too.” His Mother’s Day pledge is to raise the issue of women’s safety and sacrifn fice of Indian mothers for their family and children at every event.

I would like to see Mahesh on screen: Lara Dutta

PTI

Bollywood star Lara Dutta would like to see her tenn nis star husband Mahesh Bhupathi on the silver screen.

“I would like to see Mahn hesh on the screen but I don’t think he will ever come in front of the camera,” said the former Miss Universe.

Bhupathi married Lara in Februan ary, 2011. The couple was blessed with a daughter in January, 2012.

Talking about her 15-month old daughter, Saira, the actress said, “Mothen erhood is quite challenging. Everyday is a whole new adventure with your child.

I absolutely love it and my daughter is a happy and independent kid. We are extn tremely happy to have her in our lives.” Lara started her Bollywood journey with Priyanka Chopra in Andaaz. She has been part of commercially successful films like No Entry , Kaal, Partner and Housef full among others.

Chalo Dilli was Lara’s first venture as a producer. The film starred Lara and Vinay Pathak in the lead roles.

On its sequel, she said, “We are only contemplating things at this moment so there is nothing in the pipeline as of now.

I would love to do a sequel but if sometn thing shapes up then we will announce it.” Her production house Big Daddy productions is currently busy with two films which will go on floor in August and December respectively.

Lara was last seen in Bejoy Nambiar’s action-thriller film David.

Helen Mirren crowned best actress at top UK theatre awards

Reuters

Helen Mirren was crowned best actress at Britain’s top theatre awards on Sunday for reprisi ing her Oscar-winning portrayal of the queen, while a stage version of a novel about a boy with autism was on track to be the top winner of the Olivier awards.

Mirren, 67, has won stellar reviews for starring in The Audience, Peter Morgan’s play about the private weekly meetings between Queen Elizabeth and the 12 British prime ministers during the six decades of her reign.

Mirren is no stranger to royalty havi ing won an Academy award for the same role in the 2006 film The Queen.

The actress said the queen certainly deserved an Olivier award after receiving one of Britain’s most prestigious enterti tainment honours, a BAFTA, earlier this month for her support for the film and television industry.

“I think she deserves one for the most committed and consistent performance of the 20th century and probably the 21st century,” said Mirren on accepting the award from Harry Potter actor Daniel Radcliffe.

Her co-star, Richard McCabe, won the award for best supporting actor for playing the prime minister Howard Wilson.

But the biggest winner of the 37th Oli ivier awards looked set to be The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time that opened at the National Theatre in London in 2012 and transferred to Londi don’s West End theatre district this year.

The play, based on Mark Haddi don’s 2003 award-winning novel, was nominated for eight awards and picked up several in the first half of the glitzy awards ceremony at London’s Royal Opera House.

Luke Treadaway won the best actor award for playing 15-year-old Christopi pher, a maths prodigy with autism who sets out to solve the mystery of who killed his neighbour’s dog.

“The book created such an amazing central character who people seem to relate to even though he has behavioural problems and his way of viewing of the world,” Treadaway, 28, said on the red carpet on a chilly London evening.

Lovely lac bangles, handmade for you

AP

The British film studio, home to the James Bond franchise, announced plans on Monday for its first US movie product tion facility at a site near Atlanta.

“Today’s agreement is another step forward for the Pinewood brand internt nationally,” said Ivan Dunleavy, CEO of Pinewood Shepperton PLC, which has studio in the United Kingdom, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Germany and Malaysia. Recent films shot at Pinewood Studios, based outside of London, inct clude the upcoming Angelina Jolie film, Maleficent and Jack Ryan.

Dunleavy added that Georgia has “excellent fiscal incentives and a great crew base.” In Georgia, the large-scale film compt plex will be called Pinewood Atlanta and the studio would manage the facility undt der an agreement with a group of private investors. The studio be developed on 288 acres south of Atlanta and include at least five soundstages as well as product tion offices.

It’s the fifth major studio developmt ment or expansion announced in Georgt gia in recent months. Last week, Atlantabased developer Jacoby Development said it would build an estimated $1 billion multi-use project north of Atlanta that will include 12 soundstages as well as production offices and an arts and media school aimed at training the next generation of film industry employees.

The Pinewood project is a major coup for Georgia. While Pinewood Studios has an office in Los Angeles, it chose the Southeast for its first production facility.

While California has numerous soundstages, not many have been built in recent years as the state has been grappling with the effects of runaway production and the lagging economy. A survey last year found California lost $3 billion in wages from 2004 to 2011 bect cause of film and TV production moving to other states and countries, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times.

Half the wages went to states like Georgia that offer tax incentives and rebates to the industry. Other states include New York, Louisiana and North Carolina.

Last year, productions filmed in Georgia generated an estimated $3.1 billion in economic activity, a 29 perct cent increase from the year before. TV shows like AMC’s The Walking Dead film in Georgia, and recently The Hunger Games wrapped up in locations around Atlanta. The state is also seeing a burgt geoning film tourism industry with fans of these popular film and TV franchises planning vacations around set visits and tours.

While studio developers building soundstages are not eligible for the state’s generous tax credit programme, the production companies making films are. Georgia currently provides a 20 percent tax credit for companies that spend $500,000 or more on production and post-production in the state, either in a single production or on multiple projects.

Georgia also grants an additional 10 percent tax credit if the finished project includes a promotional logo provided by the state. If a company has little or no Georgia tax liability, it can transfer or sell its tax credits.

Pinewood has been looking for opportunities to expand. Earlier this month, Pinewood said in a joint venture agreement with one of China’s leading private media groups. That agreement calls for providing co-production opport tunities for film and television, developit ing production financing for Chinese film and TV projects and creating film projects in places like Beijing and Shanght hai.

Havelange resigns as FIFA honorary president in bribery investigation

Italy's Political Class
ON Sunday (April 28) a new government was formed in Italy. Led by Enrico Letta, a moderate member of the Partito Democratico (PD), it is the first ‘grand coalition' the country has seen since the signing of the postwar constitution in 1947. Commentators have already pointed to other firsts: the youngest cabinet in Italian history (average age 53); that with the highest proportion of female ministers (a third); and the first black minister (Cecile Kyenge, the minister for integration). Yet despite the veneer of novelty, Lampedusa's dictum from The Leopard still sums up Italy's predicament ...
The Story Of Our Time
THOSE of us who have spent years arguing against premature fiscal austerity have just had a good two weeks. Academic studies that supposedly justified austerity have lost credibility; hard-liners in the European Commission and elsewhere have softened their rhetoric. The tone of the conversation has definitely changed. My sense, however, is that many people still don't understand what this is all about. So this seems like a good time to offer a sort of refresher on the nature of our economic woes, and why this remains a very bad time for spending cuts ...

Ethiopische schittering op Doha Diamond League

Italië's politieke klasse
OP zondag (28 April) ontstond een nieuwe regering in Italië. Onder leiding van Enrico Letta, een gematigde lid van de Partito Democratico (PD), het is de eerste 'grote coalitie' het land heeft gezien sinds de ondertekening van de naoorlogse Grondwet in 1947. Commentatoren hebben al gewezen op andere primeurs: het jongste kabinet in de Italiaanse geschiedenis (gemiddelde leeftijd 53); dat met het hoogste percentage vrouwelijke ministers (een derde); en de eerste zwarte minister (Cecile Kyenge, de minister voor integratie). Nog ondanks het fineer van nieuwheid vat Lampedusa's uitspraak van The Leopard nog Italië de hachelijke situatie...
Het verhaal van onze tijd
DEGENEN onder ons die hebben jarenlang argument tegen vroegtijdige fiscale soberheid hebben zojuist een goede twee weken. Academische studies die zogenaamd gerechtvaardigd bezuinigingen hebben verloren geloofwaardigheid; hardliners in de EuropeseCommissie en elders hebben hun retoriek verzacht. De Toon van het gesprek is zeker veranderd. Mijn gevoel is echter dat veel mensen nog steeds niet wat dit is alles begrijpen over. Dus dit lijkt een goede tijd te bieden een soort van opfriscursus over de aard van onze economische ellende, en waarom blijft dit een zeer slechte tijd voor bezuinigingen...

MAHMOUD THRILLS FANS

Italy's Political Class
ON Sunday (April 28) a new government was formed in Italy. Led by Enrico Letta, a moderate member of the Partito Democratico (PD), it is the first ‘grand coalition' the country has seen since the signing of the postwar constitution in 1947. Commentators have already pointed to other firsts: the youngest cabinet in Italian history (average age 53); that with the highest proportion of female ministers (a third); and the first black minister (Cecile Kyenge, the minister for integration). Yet despite the veneer of novelty, Lampedusa's dictum from The Leopard still sums up Italy's predicament ...
The Story Of Our Time
THOSE of us who have spent years arguing against premature fiscal austerity have just had a good two weeks. Academic studies that supposedly justified austerity have lost credibility; hard-liners in the European Commission and elsewhere have softened their rhetoric. The tone of the conversation has definitely changed. My sense, however, is that many people still don't understand what this is all about. So this seems like a good time to offer a sort of refresher on the nature of our economic woes, and why this remains a very bad time for spending cuts ...

DOUBLE BLOW

Italy's Political Class
ON Sunday (April 28) a new government was formed in Italy. Led by Enrico Letta, a moderate member of the Partito Democratico (PD), it is the first ‘grand coalition' the country has seen since the signing of the postwar constitution in 1947. Commentators have already pointed to other firsts: the youngest cabinet in Italian history (average age 53); that with the highest proportion of female ministers (a third); and the first black minister (Cecile Kyenge, the minister for integration). Yet despite the veneer of novelty, Lampedusa's dictum from The Leopard still sums up Italy's predicament ...
The Story Of Our Time
THOSE of us who have spent years arguing against premature fiscal austerity have just had a good two weeks. Academic studies that supposedly justified austerity have lost credibility; hard-liners in the European Commission and elsewhere have softened their rhetoric. The tone of the conversation has definitely changed. My sense, however, is that many people still don't understand what this is all about. So this seems like a good time to offer a sort of refresher on the nature of our economic woes, and why this remains a very bad time for spending cuts ...

Al Rayyan, Gharafa suffer loss in AFC Champions League

IKOLI VICTOR

DOHA AL RAYYAN suffered a 0-2 home defeat to Al Hilal of Saudi Arabia, due to an own goal by Mohamed al Aaeldin and a diving header from Saad al Harthi, in the final rounds of the group stages of the AFC Champions League played at the Al Rayyan Stadium, on Tuesday.

With the win, Al Hilal advance into the knock-out stage of the continental competition after garnering 12 points from their six group matches. The Saudi team are now a point behind Iranian side Esteghlal, who top the group with 13 points.

UAE’s Al Ain are third on the table with Rayyan finishing at the bottom of the group with four points.

In a game of few chances, Al Hilal had to wait until 12 minutes from time before opening the score when Al Aaeldin diverted the ball into his own net after goalkeeper Oumar Barry had saved Nawaf Al Abid’s close-range effort.

And five minutes later, Harthi doubled Al Hilal’s advantage when he slid in face first to head home Nawaf Al Abid’s cross from the left beyond Barry.

Al Hilal’s Brazilian striker Wesley (Wesley Lopez da Silva) should have given his side the lead late in the first half but failed to convert from the penalty spot, thumping his effort from 12 yards off the crossbar.

Earlier in the game, Alvaro Fernandez forced a sharp save out of Al Hilal goalkeeper Abdullah al Sdairy while at the other end Al Abid’s longrange attempt was straight at Barry.

With time running out in what had been a lacklustre half, Yasir al Shahrani crossed from the right and, although goalkeeper Barry dealt with Wesley’s header, referee Minoru Tojo pointed to the spot after Abdulrahman Mesbeh was adjudged to have handled the ball.

Wesley stepped up to take the spot-kick himself but, having elected to go for power over placement, he rattled the crossbar with a shot that saw the ball bounce back over his head and to safety.

That looked like being Al Hilal’s best chance to take the points but, with just 12 minutes remaining, the Saudis finally went in front.

Al Harthi cut the ball in from the left to Wesley, whose pass found Al Abid and, although Barry saved the initial shot, the ball ricocheted off Al Aaeldin and over the line.

Five minutes later, the two-time Asian champions doubled their lead and made sure of taking all three points when Abid crossed from the left and Harthi threw himself at the ball, turning it beyond Barry and into the goal from a tight angle.

In another match of the day, already qualified Al Gharafa suffered 3-1 away loss to Iranian side Sepahan.

The Iranian scored first from Jahan Alian on eleven minutes then Majdi Siddiq levelled score just a minute before halftime.

Two quick-fire goals in the second and tenth minute of the second half condemned the Qatari side to their second defeat in the group.

Lekhwiya need a point against El Ittifq to advance to the next stage and already qualified El Jaish will face Tractor Sazi of Iran.

Pfizer’s Q1 net income up 53%, but drugmaker cuts outlook

Italy's Political Class
ON Sunday (April 28) a new government was formed in Italy. Led by Enrico Letta, a moderate member of the Partito Democratico (PD), it is the first ‘grand coalition' the country has seen since the signing of the postwar constitution in 1947. Commentators have already pointed to other firsts: the youngest cabinet in Italian history (average age 53); that with the highest proportion of female ministers (a third); and the first black minister (Cecile Kyenge, the minister for integration). Yet despite the veneer of novelty, Lampedusa's dictum from The Leopard still sums up Italy's predicament ...
The Story Of Our Time
THOSE of us who have spent years arguing against premature fiscal austerity have just had a good two weeks. Academic studies that supposedly justified austerity have lost credibility; hard-liners in the European Commission and elsewhere have softened their rhetoric. The tone of the conversation has definitely changed. My sense, however, is that many people still don't understand what this is all about. So this seems like a good time to offer a sort of refresher on the nature of our economic woes, and why this remains a very bad time for spending cuts ...